Urinary Incontinence


Our surgeons work to address this set of gynaecology symptoms as part of a multidisciplinary approach with our continence advisors and physiotherapists. Conservative approaches are usually discussed and tried before surgery in considered. Urogynaecology is a sub-specialty of Gynaecology, and in some countries is also known as Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery. A urogynaecologist manages clinical problems associated with dysfunction of the pelvic floor and bladder. Pelvic floor disorders affect the bladder, reproductive organs, and bowels. Common pelvic floor disorders include urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and faecal incontinence. Increasingly, Urogynaecologists are also responsible for the care of women who have experienced trauma to the perineum during childbirth.

There is some crossover with the subspecialty of Female Urology - these doctors are urologists who undergo additional training to be able to manage female urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and interstitial cystitis/PBS. In addition, there are colorectal surgeons who have a special interest in anal incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction related to rectal function. Contemporary urogynaecological practice encourages multidisciplinary teams working in the care of patients, with collaborative input from urogynaecologists, urologists, colorectal surgeons, elderly care physicians, and physiotherapists. This is especially important in the care of patients with complex problems, e.g. those who have undergone previous surgery or who have combined incontinence and prolapse, or combined urinary and bowel problems.

Multidisciplinary team meetings are an important part of the management pathway of these women. Urogynaecologists manage women with urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. The clinical conditions that a urogynaecologist may see include stress incontinence, overactive bladder, voiding difficulty, bladder pain, urethral pain, vaginal or uterine prolapse, obstructed defecation, anal incontinence, and perineal injury. They may also care for women with vesico-vaginal or rectovaginal fistulae with specialist training, and in conjunction with other specialties.